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Q&A with Can Evrenol

Director of Baskin, Can Evrenol, was extremely gracious and answered some questions we had about the film as well as his life with film. Check out our Baskin episode too!

 

HorrorBull: You’ve made quite a few short films (which can be found here). What made Baskin the one you thought would be the best feature? What separates the short film-making process and the process of making features?

 

Can: I guess Baskin has the most “mature” of the 6 of my immature short films. It felt like a scene from an actual feature film. It was the only expensive short film I did and it worked. As for the feature it was the same mind set for me, just a longer run.

 

HorrorBull: Growing up in Turkey, did you have access to all the essential horror films from other parts of the world or were they discovered once you went to college? What horror films and directors did you idolize growing up? Are there any essential Turkish films we should check out?

 

Can: Yes I did. The foreign horror VHS market was huge in 80’s Turkey. Turkish cinema was almost dead in the 80’s and early 90’s. I idolized Knight Rider, ConanRobocopKrull, and Ivan Drago as a kid. But I was scared of actual horror films and I grew distant to the horror classics because of that. Lynch and Cronenberg were my favorites in college and through b-movies and extreme arthouse cinema I discovered Haneke, Noe, Japanese Anime, Romero, Hooper, Hammer Films, Fulci, Argento all at once. It was a renaissance in my life. And directors like Kubrick, Coppola, Veerhoeven & DePalma has always been my most respected and awe-inspiring filmmakers.

 

HorrorBull: Baskin is a visceral and gory film. What movie did you reference on set to give people an idea about what you were trying to make?

 

Can: Frontiers and Shining, amongst many other films

 

HorrorBull: What were some of the obstacles you had to hurdle while making a horror film in Turkey?

 

Can: 90% of the cast and crew had very little fantastic film culture

 

HorrorBull: Baskin has been shown at some major genre film festivals, is there one that has been your favorite to attend?

 

Can: Sitges & Fantastic Fest

 

HorrorBull: Who is your perfect audience for a showing of the movie? Where have you encountered your favorite audience so far?

 

Can: Glasgow Frightfest was great in that sense. I guess if you are type who enjoys both Carpenter and Ceylan, you will probably digBaskin.

 

HorrorBull: Are there currently any films you’ve seen at festivals or through friends that you think genre fans are going to completely lose their minds about in the next year?

 

Can: Hardcore Henry! As personal favorites: Nina ForeverThe Similars & Doglegs

 

HorrorBull: The comment I got most about Baskin at the film festival was “I haven’t seen a film that’s stuck with me like this one in a long time.” What film/films have you not been able to get out of your head long after you’ve left the theater?

 

Can: The Blair Witch Project

 

HorrorBull: If there was one song you could’ve got the rights to for this film, what would it have been?

 

Can: Oh too many!

 

HorrorBull: Baskin takes place mostly/totally at night. What are the challenges associated with that shooting schedule? Does it require a different sort of stamina?

 

Can: Not really. I loved it. It almost felt like we lived only at night and only in the Baskin realm.

 

HorrorBull: What aspects, both practical and ideological, of making the film so surreal appealed to you? Was it a function of the film’s plot, or was it an excuse for you to test some of your own filmmaking boundaries?

 

Can: I guess it was an excuse for you to test some of your own filmmaking boundaries and when we wrote the film we just experimented and explored to make a puzzle of a film with a coherent nightmare feel to it.

 

HorrorBull: There were plenty of interesting shots in the movie. What was the trickiest to pull off, and how did it make you feel to get it right?

 

Can: The underwater shot took us all night:) And having naked people on set for the first time all covered in blood and mud was challenging. Directing a first time actor delivering a speech was stressful. The rape scene, frogs, decoration of the building, guerilla makeup fx… really, every single day of shoot was a new and unique challenge.

 

HorrorBull: How often does your last name get misspelled as Evernol?

 

Can: Hahahh yeah I get that a lot!

 

On Wed, May 11, 2016 at 2:04 PM, Bryan Center <bryncntr@gmail.com> wrote:

We had the opportunity to ask Baskin director Can Evrenol some questions. He was gracious enough to answer them and not block us!

HorrorBull: You’ve made quite a few short films (which can be found here). What made Baskin the one you thought would be the best feature? What separates the short film-making process and the process of making features?

 

Can:I guess Baskin has the most “mature” of the 6 of my immature short films. It felt like a scene from an actual feature film. It was the only expensive short film I did and it worked. – As for the feature it was the same mind set for me, just a longer run.

 

HorrorBull: Growing up in Turkey, did you have access to all the essential horror films from other parts of the world or were they discovered once you went to college? -Alt. version of this question: what horror films and directors did you idolize growing up? Are there any essential Turkish films we should check out?

 

Can:Yes I did. The foreign horror vhs market was huge in 80’s Turkey. Turkish cinema was almost dead in the 80’s and early 90’s. I idolized Knight Rider, ConanRobocopKrull, and Ivan Drago as a kid. But I was scared of actual horror films and I grew distant to the horror classics because of that. Lynch and Cronenberg were my favorites in college and through bmovies and extreme arthouse cinema I discovered Haneke, Noe, Japanese Anime, Romero, Hooper, Hammer Films, Fulci, Argento all at once. It was a reneaissance in my life. And directors like Kubrick, Coppola, Veerhoeven & DePalma has always been my most respected and awe insprinig filmmakers

 

HorrorBull: Baskin is a visceral and gory film. What movie did you reference on set to give people an idea about what you were trying to make?

 

Can: Frontiers and Shining, amongst many other films

 

HorrorBull: What were some of the obstacles you had to hurdle while making a horror film in Turkey?

 

Can:90% of the cast and crew had very little, fantastic film culture

 

HorrorBull: Baskin has been shown at some major genre film festivals, is there one that has been your favorite to attend?

 

Can:Sitges & Fantastic Fest

 

HorrorBull: Who is your perfect audience for a showing of the movie? Where have you encountered your favorite audience so far?

 

Can: Glasgow Frightfest was great in that sense. I guess if you are type who enjoys both Carpenter and Ceylan, you will probably dig Baskin.

 

HorrorBull: Are there currently any films you’ve seen at festivals or through friends that you think genre fans are going to completely lose their minds about in the next year?

 

Can: Hardcore Henry! As personal favorites: Nina ForeverThe Similars & Doglegs

 

HorrorBull: The comment I got most about Baskin at the film festival was “I haven’t seen a film that’s stuck with me like this one in a long time”. What film/films have you not been able to get out of your head long after you’ve left the theater?

 

Can: The Blair Witch Project

 

HorrorBull: If there was one song you could’ve got the rights to for this film, what would it have been?

 

Can: Oh too many!

 

HorrorBull: Baskin takes place mostly / totally at night. What are the challenges associated with that shooting schedule? Does it require a different sort of stamina?

 

Can: Not really. I loved it. It almost felt like we lived only at night and only in the Baskin realm

 

HorrorBull: What aspects, both practical and ideological, of making the film so surreal appealed to you? Was it a function of the film’s plot, or was it an excuse for you to test some of your own filmmaking boundaries?

 

Can: I guess it was an excuse for you to test some of your own filmmaking boundaries and when we wrote the film we just experimented and explored to make a puzzle of a film with a coherent nightmare feel to it.

 

HorrorBull: There were plenty of interesting shots in the movie. What was the trickiest to pull off, and how did it make you feel to get it right?

 

Can: The underwatershot took us all night:) And having naked people on set for the first time all covered in blood and mud was challenging. Directing a first time actor delivering a speech was stressful. The rape scene, frogs, decıration of the building, guerilla makeup fx… really, every single day of shoot was a new and unique challange

 

HorrorBull: How often does your last name get misspelled as Evernol?

 

Can: Hahahh yeah i get that a lot!

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